St. Helens to Beacon Rock

Beacon Rock, Washington, July 11, 2012sequoia at beacon rock

S/V Sequoia is at it again – but this time, it’s a relatively short cruise, up the Columbia River as far as Hood River or The Dalles – if we can get there! The challenge will be the water below the Bonneville Dam – running reportedly as much as 12 knots in the middle of the channel. We flat out can’t go 12 knots – our maximum is eight – so unless we find the back eddies, or unless the reports are all wrong, we may never make it to the dam. If we do make it, we hear they are having “nuclear days” in Hood River, with winds of 35 knots, 8 foot waves and hundreds of windsurfers and kiteboarders… Maybe more excitement there than we’ve ever seen out on an ocean!

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Beacon Rock through the Bonneville Dam Locks to Cascade Locks

railing beacon rockOur time at Beacon Rock was a real delight. You’re in the middle of the mountains, with evergreens all around, bright warm sunshine and friendly people. During our first full day there, I climbed Beacon Rock (an easy trail with 52 switchbacks up to the top.) The views were so beautiful and the hike so pleasant, that I persuaded Craig to come with me for a repeat on the second day.

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To Hood River and Back

racing lasersJuly 18, 2012

I left you in Cascade Locks last time I wrote, and since then we’ve been to Hood River and now back almost to Cascade Locks.   Hood River was great, with warm winds, lots of sunshine, and clouds of board kites over the river, like a swarm of brilliantly colored mosquitos. The climate there has been a real contrast to the clouds and precipitation of Western Oregon.

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Coming Home

leaving government coveScappoose, OR

July 21, 2012

When I last wrote, we were anchored in Government Cove, just upriver from Cascade Locks. We spent a calm night on the anchor – no wind, not much current. It really is quite a beautiful spot. We pulled up the anchor and found it to be covered with a lot of mud and a certain amount of fishing tackle. We got underway in time to make the designated locking time for recreational boats at Bonneville Dam. As we passed under the Bridge of the Gods, I again noticed all the Indian fishing platforms. No one was fishing, but presumably when the salmon are running, there’s a lot of activity in this area. It would be fun to come back in September and see the fishing.

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